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The City of Kingston, NY

    Welcome to the City of Kingston, NY

    Kingston, dating to the arrival of the Dutch in 1652, is a vibrant city with rich history and architecture, was the state's first capital, and a thriving arts community. City Hall is in the heart of the community at 420 Broadway, and is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., except July & August (9 a.m. to 4 p.m.).  Come tour our historic City, with restaurants that are among the region's finest, and local shopping that promises unique finds.

    Historic Churches

    Kingston is home to many historic churches. The oldest church still standing is the First Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of Kingston which was organized in 1659. Referred to as The Old Dutch Church, it is located in Uptown Kingston. Many of the city's historic churches populate Wurts street (6 in one block) among them Hudson Valley Wedding Chapel is a recently restored church built in 1867 and now a chapel hosting weddings. Another church in the Rondout is located at 72 Spring Street. Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church was founded in 1849. The original church building at the corner of Hunter Street and Ravine Street burned to the ground in the late 1850s. The current church on Spring Street was built in 1874.

    Kingston, NY

    Kingston became New York's first capital in 1777, and was burned by the British on October 13, 1777, after the Battles of Saratoga. In the 19th century, the city became an important transport hub after the discovery of natural cement in the region, and had both railroad and canal connections.

    Kingston, NY

    The town of Rondout, New York, now a part of the city of Kingston, became an important freight hub for the transportation of coal from Honesdale, Pennsylvania to New York City through the Delaware and Hudson Canal. This hub was later used to transport other goods, including bluestone. Kingston shaped and shipped most of the bluestone made to create the sidewalks of New York City.

     

    Contact Us

    City Hall Address:
    420 Broadway
    Kingston, New York
    12401

    Phone:
    (845) 331-0080

    DRI: Uptown Transportation Improvements

    As part of this project, Schwenk Drive from Fair Street to Hurley Avenue will be redesigned to facilitate travel by foot and bicycle as well as by car.

    Project Host
    City of Kingston
    Project Goals
    The City of Kingston will, within the budget for the project, improve pedestrian access, traffic circulation, and key intersections within the Stockade Business District as identified in previous transportation plans and including the Albany/Clinton Avenue intersection. Upgrades will improve safety and navigability while attracting tourism, shopping, dining and business activity to the area. Improvements to Schwenk Drive between Washington Avenue and Fair Street will create a desirable, walkable, pedestrian and bicycle-friendly connection to the SBD, and will eventually connect the Kingston Greenline trail system. 
    Funder(s) & Amounts
    NYS Department of State (NYSDOS) & Governor Cuomo's Office - $2,327,500.00 

    Project Manager's Contact Information
    Kristen Wilson
    Director of Grants Management
    845-334-3962
    kwilson@kingston-ny.gov
    Project Status (Updated June 2020)
    The City contracted with Hudson Valley Engineering Associates (HVEA) last fall to conduct site and traffic analyses and develop designs for the project. The Project Advisory Committee met to review initial concepts in February and a public survey to collect additional information and viewpoints launched in May. Results of the survey will be analyzed and presented to the PAC for comment. Additional engagement tools will be available on our public engagement site in late June: EngageKingston.com - Uptown Transportation Improvements.  The survey results and additional community feedback will help inform the best direction that the City should take with regard to the types of features the designs should incorporate. The next steps are to narrow preliminary designs for presentation to the general public.